Love Bombs

Love Bombs

Lincoln Cent

Lincoln Cent

During a visit to Chad’s childhood home in Maryland, I was taken to the “museum,” a narrow staircase, down to what appeared to be a bunker below a suburban home, filled with art from Chad’s childhood.  What was amazing was that, at an early age, every piece had a concept behind it.  Most kids just try to draw something in their lives, but Chad’s work went much deeper.

I asked Chad about his Love Bombs piece; on the surface everything looks great, publicly displaying affection and making single people jealous. But inside lies the potential for destruction. A ticking time bomb waiting to go off. It could be her fault, or his, or both. The fact is that most relationships tend to explode in our faces, especially the most openly affectionate ones. 

Regarding the Lincoln cent; Americans (whether we know it or not) are quite familiar with the low level relief sculpture of Victor David Brenner. His study of our 16th president in profile graces the obverse of the one cent piece. The first issue was in 1909, the 1909 s being worth many thousands of dollars today. This painting is a tribute to his remarkable design and glorifies what we, today, will probably not bend over to pick up.

Chad’s work, influenced by Basquiat, was educated at the Maryland Institute of Art.  After college, Chad headed to the East Village NYC for inspiration.

"I remember letting a homeless guy stay with me and working on some art together. I saw the East Village as a huge opportunity to explore and become more creative."

After bouncing around a bunch of start-ups, Chad landed in advertising, where he uses his conceptual skills to create ads for top brands.  He looks forward to creating more artwork with his son.

Binky Grenade

Binky Grenade

Chad and his son

Chad and his son